Available Courses 2018-2019

Bishop O'Connell High School offers a curriculum that is designed to prepare students for admission to leading colleges and universities. View available courses for the 2018-2019 school year by selecting from the tabs below. For complete information on our program offerings, please refer to the printed Course Catalog (DOWNLOAD HERE or available from the Admissions or Academics offices).

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Summer Course Offerings
Textbook Lists for 2018-2019 Course

Religion

9130 REVELATION OF JESUS CHRIST IN SCRIPTURE
9 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to give students a general knowledge of and appreciation for Sacred Scripture with a focus on the question: What does it mean to be human and how is that shown in Scripture? Through their study of the Bible, students will encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In this course, they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. Students will become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the books included in each section, learning to read the Bible and deepening their relationship with God. Special attention will be given to the gospels, where students may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

9135 WHO IS JESUS CHRIST?
9 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to introduce students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. Students will come to understand that Jesus Christ is God’s ultimate Revelation to us. Special attention will be given to study of the Trinity, the Incarnation and to each person’s dignity as a child of God with a personal call to holiness. In learning about who Jesus is, students will also learn who He calls them to be.

9230 THE MISSION OF JESUS CHRIST
10 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to help students understand all that God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Students will come to learn that, for all eternity, God has planned to us to share eternal happiness with Him through the redemption Christ won for us and in which we come to share through Him. Students will learn what it means to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple living within the community of believers entails.

9235 MISSION OF THE CHURCH
10 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to show how the Mission of Jesus Christ continues in the Church and how in and through the Church we encounter the living Jesus Christ. In the context of understanding the grace of living in community, students will study how the Church was founded by Christ through the apostles and is sustained by Christ in each generation through the Holy Spirit. Students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today with both divine and human elements. Students will learn about the sacred nature of the Church and become more aware of their own role as members of the Church.

9330 SACRAMENTS: ENCOUNTERS WITH JESUS CHRIST
11 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to help students understand that, in the sacraments, especially in the Eucharist, Christ can be encountered today in a full and real way. Students will examine each of the sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life and use faith as a guide in life.

9335 MORALITY: NEW LIFE IN JESUS CHRIST
11 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to help students understand that through Christ they can fully live out God’s plan for their lives. Students learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples.

9455 LIVING AS A DISCIPLE OF CHRIST IN SOCIETY
12 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to provide students with a strong foundation in the Church’s social teaching. Students learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s mission. Students learn how to apply the Church’s social teaching to particular current events and contemporary political issues. This course is required for all seniors.

9465 THE CHURCH IN THE 20TH CENTURY
12 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to examine the Church through the lens of each papacy of the 20th century with an emphasis on people, movements, and events through which the Church had an impact on society. Recognizing the Church as the living body of Christ and studying the contributions of modern saints to our understanding of God’s universal call to holiness, students learn, through this study of recent Church history, how God continues to act in human history.

9475 SHARING THE FAITH IN THE WORLD TODAY
12 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to build on the foundational truth that Jesus Christ established the Catholic Church and entrusted to the Church the fullness of God’s Revelation. The course provides students with skills of critical thinking and respectful communication needed to share the truths of the Catholic faith with others in the world today. This study of apologetics culminates in a capstone research project on a specific topic central to the Church’s new evangelization.

9485 WITNESSING THE GOSPEL
12 SEM .5 cr
The purpose of this semester course is to allow students to develop a spirituality deeply centered in the mystery of God’s grace and the universal call to holiness. Efforts are made to build a foundation of faith, virtue and knowledge for an adult practice of moral and ethical behavior in today’s secular society. Emphasis is placed on being active members of parish communities; Catholic students may use this course to earn a preliminary Catholic catechist certificate.

English

1100 ENGLISH 1
9 YR 1.0 cr
The freshman course includes instruction in both language skills and literature. The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, and drama. The course emphasizes critical reading and critical thinking skills. Vocabulary study is stressed and is taken from the reading, as well as from supplementary sources.

The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, drama and non-fiction selections. Correct usage, grammar, sentence structure, intensive paragraph study, and library skills are presented in a developmental sequence to assure achievement. Students begin learning the documentation process in the Modern Language Association (MLA) style and gain proficiency in the multiple-paragraph essay. NCAA

1150 ENGLISH 1 HONORS
9 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: HSPT verbal and language scores >= 90 and satisfactory English 8 grades; or results of English honors qualifying exam.
This course is designed for freshmen who demonstrate an above grade-level proficiency in reading and writing. The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, and drama. The program examines the contributions of influential writers from ancient to modern times. The more advanced points of grammar and usage are covered, as it is expected that students have a basic understanding of the rules that govern the language. Writing and reading assignments are of great frequency and sophistication requiring the student to provide in-depth analysis in both written and discussion formats. NCAA

4000 INTEGRATED BIOLOGY AND ENGLISH (IBE)
9 YR 2.0 cr

Prerequisites: Students must meet qualifications for Biology I Honors.
IBE is an interdisciplinary course that integrates Biology 1 Honors (4210) and English I (1100) with an authentic community-based field research program. This integrated course, which maintains the full content of both the Honors Biology (4210) and English 1 (1100) curricula, is designed to capitalize on the natural connections between these science and language arts courses through an ongoing interdisciplinary research project focused on local environmental issues. Informational writing and technology are used to enhance students’ conceptual understanding and real-world problem solving skills. This course is designed for students with above average academic maturity and ability, a strong interest in both science and effective communication, and a commitment to a collaborative work ethic. This Honors Biology/English 9 integration links the two courses through an on-going research project, at the same time preserving the distinctive components of each discipline. Students earn 1.0 credit in Biology 1 Honors (4210) and 1.0 credit in English 1 (1100).

The English 1 (1100) component of this course includes instruction in both language skills and literature. The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, and drama. The course emphasizes critical reading and critical thinking skills, supplementing the college prep English 1 experience with opportunities for technical writing and research. Vocabulary study is stressed and is taken from the reading, as well as supplementary sources.

The Biology 1 Honors (4210) component of this course emphasizes the molecular approach to the study of biology including chemistry for biology students, cell biology, bioenergetics, heredity, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, diversity of organisms, and ecology as major units of study. A current, comprehensive background of biology is presented. The course relies heavily on daily readings and study and includes laboratory experiences with emphasis on experimental design, critical thinking, and problem- solving skills. NCAA

1200 ENGLISH 2
10 YR 1.0cr

The sophomore course includes instruction in both language and literature. The literature program introduces students to works in world literature and examines the contributions of influential writers from ancient to modern times. Critical reading and thinking skills, as well as vocabulary study, continue to be emphasized.The course includes both written and oral language development. The language program builds on the freshman course and includes overall review of usage and grammar. The development of a thesis in the five-paragraph format is a central aspect of this course. Experiences in creative writing are offered. Library and research skills concentrate on preparing students to write documented papers. Instruction in note taking and paraphrasing from source material, together with renewed instruction in the Modern Language Association (MLA) method of documentation, continues. NCAA

1250 ENGLISH 2 HONORS

10 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in English 1 Honors; A in English 1; or department approval. The literature program introduces students to works in world literature and examines the contributions of influential writers from ancient to modern times. Student writing is frequent and requires increasing sophistication in word choice, sentence structure, paragraph development, and overall impact. A research paper on a literary topic isa requirement of this course. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions and to read and analyze a number of texts that supplement the classroom curriculum. NCAA

1300 ENGLISH 3
11 YR 1.0 cr

The junior course includes both composition and literature. The literature program surveys the major influences and writers in American literature from colonial times to the present. The program continues to emphasize the critical aspects of reading and thinking demonstrated through critical writing. Vocabulary study continues in preparation for the PSAT and SAT.The composition program continues to develop skills learned in the freshmanand sophomore courses and focuses on the various rhetorical forms of argument: persuasion, expanded definition, comparison/contrast, and literary analysis. Creative writing opportunities are provided. Documentation skills are developed further through the assignment of an extended research paper that develops a thesis. NCAA


1350 ENGLISH 3 HONORS 11 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisites: B or higher in English 2 Honors; A in English 2; or department approval. The junior course includes both composition and literature. The literature program surveys the major influences and writers in American literature from colonial times to the present. Students in this course have shown a readiness to use higher levelthinking skills when engaging literary texts, as evidenced by written and oral work that demonstrate an ability to read carefully, judge soundly, and synthesize logically. Students write frequently, exhibiting the reading and analytical skills necessary to conduct sound literary analysis. Students must possess strong organizational skills, the ability to work independently, and the desire to read and analyze several texts in addition to the classroom curriculum. A research paper is a requirement of this course. NCAA

1360 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 11 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisites: A- in English 2 Honors or department approval. Writing sample may be required.This college level course is offered to junior students who have demonstrated a high degree of interest and proficiency in writing. The course is organized to assist students to perform well on the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in English Language and Composition administered by the College Board in May and required of all students taking this course.This course provides for the study and writing of various kinds of analytic or personal essays on nonliterary topics and includes instruction in rhetorical aims, modes, and techniques, and how to apply those principles in writing assignments. Although non- fiction is the focus of the AP exam in English Language and Composition, the American literature curriculum, including poetry and fiction, is thoroughly covered in this course. Nonfiction selections are taken from a wide variety of sources. Students who take this course should plan to take AP English Literature in their senior year.The course complements the current curriculum offered by the English department in its content and skills building. Students are asked to write literary analysis papers; in addition, students write in-class essays to practice classic argumentation and to expand upon the ideas highlighted by the texts on the syllabus. A research paper is a requirement of this course. NCAA

1400 ENGLISH 4 12 YR 1.0 cr

The senior course includes both literature and composition components. The literature program surveys the major works, writers, and influences in the British tradition. Critical skills in reading, thinking, and writing continue to be emphasized and applied.The composition program builds on the skills learned in the first three years and challenges students to refine writing skills in preparation for researching, developing, and documenting a thesis topic in an extended, critical paper. Creative writing opportunities are provided to give the student a forum for creative expression. NCAA


1420 ENGLISH 4 HONORS 12 YR 1.0 crPrerequisites: B or higher in English 3 Honors; A in English 3; or department approval. The senior course includes both literature and composition components. The literature program surveys the major works, writers, and influences in the British tradition. The senior honors course is designed for students who have demonstrated an ability to engage in clear and insightful literary analysis, to produce clear and cohesive essays, and to engage in advanced classroom discussions. Students are expected to read and analyze several texts in addition to the classroom curriculum. A research paper is a requirement of this course. NCAA

1450 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE 12 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisites: B or higher in AP English Language; A- in English 3 Honors; or department approval.This college level course is offered to highly motivated students of English in senior year. This course is organized to assist students to perform well on the Advanced Placement (AP) Examination in English Literature administered by the College Board in May and required of all students taking this course.This course includes both literature and composition. The literature is primarily British- based but includes readings from both European and American authors. Critical analysis, sound judgment, and logical synthesis in interpreting the readings are demonstratedin the frequent writing of critical essays. A seminar approach to oral discussions provides a forum for students to interact and to share insights in order to deepen their understanding and appreciation of the readings. Students are expected to read and analyze ten to twelve full-length works in addition to the classroom curriculum. A research paper is a requirement of this course. NCAA

1535 CREATIVE WRITING 11-12 SEM .5 cr

This elective course offers a supportive and instructional environment for students wishing to develop their creative writing abilities. Participants work in the genres of poetry, short fiction, drama, and screenplay writing. Writing is supported by readings, classical and modern, in each of these genres. The practical aim of this course is to generate a creative writing portfolio that students may use to further their ambitions beyond the high school level. Students are provided with opportunities to submit their writing for publication and consideration in relevant contests. This course is only available during the first semester. NCAA

6860 HUMANITIES HONORS 11-12 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisite: B+ or higher in English.This elective honors course presents artistic patterns of relationship from ancient Greece to the present among philosophy, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting and music—all in light of the major historical events of each period. Content focuses on the interrelationships between arts and ideas in the framework of their proper historical and cultural settings. This class also serves as a fine arts or social studies elective. NCAA


1370 AMERICAN MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE 11-12 SEM .5 cr.

This elective course explores American diversity through reading and discussion of contemporary fiction, nonfiction, poetry and drama. Students examine major literary themes and changing definitions of identity, racism, nativism, the American Dream, social values and more. This class requires participants to approach texts with openness and respect for new perspectives and disparate communities. Students evaluate writing strategies and techniques of each author and incorporate research of historical and cultural contexts of works to develop a greater appreciation of diverse cultural texts that represent America. NCAA

1390 PUBLIC SPEAKING 10-12 SEM .5 cr

This elective course includes the basics of effective speaking and listening skills, preparation and tools for giving a speech, and the opportunity to present several types of speeches followed by evaluation by teacher and peers. This course aims to improve knowledge of effective communication skills as well as self-confidence. This class fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for graduation. NCAA

1395 SPEAKING AND PRESENTATION SKILLS 9 SEM .5 cr

This elective course is designed to provide freshmen with skills and techniques needed to effectively communicate in an academic environment. Students learn speaking skills such as clarity, tone, and audience awareness for classroom presentations and various collaborative learning settings. Interactive use of technology is taught as an integral element of successful presentations.

6700 INTRO TO FILM 11-12 SEM .5 cr

This elective course presents an in-depth treatment of film as a powerful 20th and 21st century art form. Students become familiar with film language and technique, study the history of American film, and critique numerous films using the knowledge they acquire through viewing clips from the greatest movies made, as well as from full- length presentations. The course requires discussion and critical writing. Topics to bediscussed include: photography, sets/settings, movement, editing, sound, acting, drama, story, writing, ideology, and theory. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.

1510 JOURNALISM 10-12 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisites: B or higher in current English class. Writing sample may be required.This elective course introduces students to the fundamental components of journalism. News and feature writing styles are learned once students have acquired adequate reporting, interviewing, and editing skills. As students “cover” the school community, worthy student writing is published in The Visor, the school newspaper. The curriculum explores the history of journalism in the United States, photojournalism, newspaper ethics, and television broadcasting. This course fulfills the computer and Fine Arts requirements for graduation.


1460 YEARBOOK PRODUCTION 10-12 YR 1.0 cr

Prerequisite: Recommendation of current English teacher; completion of yearbook staff application.

This elective course introduces students to the successful production of a school yearbook. Students learn about the various sections of the yearbook and how to write effective yearbook articles, captions, and headlines. They also learn how to organize and conduct student and faculty interviews, design layouts on the computer using Adobe InDesign, and assemble the pages of the yearbook to meet structure production deadlines. Effective editing, revision, and photography skills are developed. This course fulfills the computer and Fine Arts requirements for graduation.

Fine Arts

VISUAL ARTS

6010 ART 1
9-11 YR 1.0 cr
This course is a foundation course in basic art and design. Students are introduced to the Elements of Design and Principles of Composition. Students work in various techniques and mediums on projects designed to sharpen their skills of art through observation, design and composition. Students learn to look at art thoughtfully and critically and begin to develop their own aesthetic sense. There are brief lectures and PowerPoint presentations exploring various artists and their mediums. Students develop an art vocabulary as well as gaining an understanding and practice of group and individual critiques. By the conclusion of the course, students are able to formulate a personal and informed response to the question: “What is art?”

6020 ART 2
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Art 1 or Graphic Design or presentation of a portfolio for instructor permission.
This course is offered as a sequential step from Art 1 or Graphic Design. Students build on previous knowledge and vocabulary and have the opportunity to publish their work in the school art and literary magazine. They may also participate in shows outside the school environment. Students focus on beginning to build a portfolio.

6030 ADVANCED ART HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Formal review of a portfolio containing three completed drawings, including one perspective drawing, and permission of a committee of art instructors.
Advanced Art Honors provides students with the opportunity to engage in the advanced study of art processes, vocabulary and art history. Students are expected to demonstrate principles and elements in art as well as visually communicate ideas, using advanced approaches in drawing and painting. The instructor guides students to form goals and develop individual styles, to become familiar with art schools and art related careers. Students develop a portfolio of their work and contribute artwork to the Largesse and to displays within and outside the school. There is a focus on presentation, quality work, exhibition and purpose.

6045 AP DRAWING
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Formal review of a portfolio containing four completed drawings and permission from a committee of art instructors.
This course is designed for students who demonstrate proficient skills in drawing and painting. Students apply the elements and principles of art effectively to communicate their ideas visually and verbally in two dimensions. They must exhibit a strong commitment to their discipline. Students are required to submit a portfolio for consideration to the Advanced Placement Board in May for possible college credit pending a qualifying score.

6049 AP ART HISTORY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ in English and permission of AP instructor.
What is art? This college level course explores the history of the art of the world from the prehistoric era to the present. The class addresses stylistic development and cultural values, as well as the historical context that influence artistic production and practice. The class uses an interdisciplinary approach to discuss style, content, meaning, patronage, faith, interpretation, context, and significance of works of art, preparing students for the AP Art History exam in May which all students enrolled in the class are required to take. The course includes one research paper. This course also serves as an elective Social Studies credit.

6055 THE ART OF THE UNITED STATES HONORS
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This honors course presents the history of art in the United States from the early Colonial period to the present including, but not limited to Colonial portraiture, American Impressionism, modern abstraction, the Harlem Renaissance, Mexican muralists, Regionalism and WPA art, and Pop Art. The class examines major artists and movements by addressing stylistic developments and cultural values, as well as the historical context that influenced artistic production. The class discusses style, content, meaning, patronage, faith, interpretation, and context. Field trips to local art centers are scheduled to provide first-hand experiences with the art of our nation.

6860 HUMANITIES HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: B+ in English.
This honors course presents artistic patterns of relationship from ancient Greece to the present among philosophy, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting and music–all in light of the major historical events of each period. Content focuses on the interrelationships between arts and ideas in the framework of their proper historical and cultural settings. This class also serves as an English or social studies elective. NCAA

6510 PHOTOGRAPHY
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This is a foundation course in basic skills and understanding in photography. Students are introduced to the Elements of Design and Principles of Composition. Students work in various techniques and mediums in projects designed to sharpen their skills in photography through observation, design and composition. Students learn to look at photography thoughtfully and critically and begin to develop their own aesthetic sense. There are brief lectures and PowerPoint presentations exploring various artists and their mediums. Students develop a photography vocabulary and gain an understanding of and practice in group and individual critiques. By the conclusion of the course, students are able to formulate a personal and informed response to the question: “What is photography?”

6520 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY
11-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: Permission from instructor.
This course is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to learn advanced techniques in 35mm film and Digital camera photography. Students build upon skills learned in the introductory photography course. Topics may include: documentary photography (photojournalism), studio photography (portrait lighting techniques), how to build strong compositions, operation of a SLR (single lens reflex) camera, and advanced Photoshop techniques.

6600 GRAPHIC DESIGN
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course focuses on commercial design. Students learn the fundamentals of design, including layout, illustration, fashion, poster design and T-shirt design. They experience graphic history and disciplines through multi-media and become comfortable working with a variety of materials.

6610 CREATIVE EXPRESSION
9 SEM .5 cr
This course provides a hands-on introduction to the graphic and visual arts with the belief that these experiences foster original, intelligent thought processes and provide students with the opportunity for self-expression. Students cover various techniques and mediums, including but not limited to painting, drawing, graphic and digital design, photography, and sculpture. In addition to the creative processes, students engage in guided critical discussions to develop an art vocabulary and critiquing skills.

MUSIC

6350 CONCERT BAND
9-10 YR 1.0 cr
This class is open to any student who has beginner’s proficiency or would like to start playing an instrument. Students learn music fundamentals and basic theory as well as musicianship through performance of technical exercises, scales, and band literature. A continuing goal of the course is to develop students’ skills as a musician, including historical connections between art, history, architecture, and music. In addition, concert etiquette and team building skills are developed. Personal practice on one’s instrument is necessary for success in band class.

6440 SYMPHONIC BAND
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
6450 SYMPHONIC BAND HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Admission to these courses is based on playing ability and a placement audition.
Students continue to learn music theory through the performance of technical exercises, scales, and band literature. A continuing goal of this course is developing mature musicianship in performance. Skills include the process of critically analyzing personal and group performance skills, understanding historical concepts and intermediate theory practices, and the ability to work as a team member. Personal practice on one’s instrument is necessary for success in band class. Students may earn honors credit for this course with additional requirements including performing at school functions, school sanctioned functions, and volunteer events. Attendance at two outside Fine Arts performances per semester is required for honors credit.

6200 STRINGS
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
6250 STRINGS HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Admission to this course is based on playing experience and placement audition.
This class is open to orchestral string instruments. Students learn music fundamentals, theory, and musicianship through performance of technical exercises, scales, and orchestral literature. A continuing goal of the course is to develop students’ skills as a musician, including historical connections between art, history, architecture, and music. In addition, concert etiquette and team building skills are developed. Personal practice on one’s instrument is necessary for success in orchestra class. Students may earn honors credit for this course after completing one year in Strings class and with additional requirements including performing at school functions, school sanctioned functions, and volunteer events. Attendance at two outside Fine Arts performances per semester is required for honors credit.

6455 PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE
9-12 SEM .5 cr
This class is designed for students who are completely new to percussion instruments or students who play piano and would like to transfer their piano skills into playing mallet percussion instruments. The course begins with basic percussion techniques and includes learning the fundamentals of playing a variety of percussion instruments and developing and applying musicianship and ensemble skills to the genre. Students are expected to learn how to read music, learn how to play a variety of percussion instruments, and perform as an ensemble by the end of the school year. A wide variety of percussion techniques, styles, and music are taught, ranging from traditional western music to contemporary percussion ensemble music. Students are expected to exhibit a strong work ethic and a high level of discipline.

6831 JAZZ ENSEMBLE
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Department audition and one year in orchestra or guitar class (for strings and guitar) or one year in concert or symphonic band (for wind and percussion).
The ensemble is made up of the standard big band instrumentation. Students learn many different styles of popular music including jazz, rock, fusion, Latin, and blues. Each student in the ensemble also learns jazz theory, jazz history, and the art of improvisation. This class meets after school.

6260 PIANO FUNDAMENTALS
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This class is designed for students who are beginners or who have very little prior piano experience. This class covers basic theory and harmony, scales and arpeggios, improvisational techniques, music history, and performance practices. This course prepares students for further piano study.

6362 PIANO
11-12 SEM .5 cr
6368 PIANO HONORS
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This piano seminar is designed for students who have completed Piano Fundamentals or students who have prior experience at the intermediate level or above. Admission to the course is based on playing experience and a placement audition. Students learn basic theory and harmony, scales and arpeggios, improvisational techniques, music history, and performance practices. This course is designed to shape a well-rounded pianist. This course is available for honors credit with audition and instructor approval.

6586 ADVANCED PIANO ACCOMPANIMENT
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: Admission only through audition for course instructor.
Advanced Piano Accompaniment is offered by audition to students who demonstrate a high level of proficiency on the instrument. In this course, students learn piano technique related to choral and instrumental accompaniment: how to read vocal parts from a choral score, to transpose and reduce an orchestral score, to improvise keyboard accompaniments for lead sheets, to follow a conductor or solo performer, and to sight read in a live performance setting. Students also receive practical training through participation in regular choral rehearsals and coaching from a specialist.

6370 BEGINNING GUITAR
9-12 SEM .5 cr
Beginning Guitar is a course designed for those with little to no knowledge of how to play guitar. The focus of this class is on basic classical guitar techniques and playing styles. A mixture of older traditional songs and more contemporary pop tunes is used to educate the student on the proper methods of playing. Basic music theory, guitar history and the ability to read music are taught as well.

6380 INTERMEDIATE GUITAR
9-12 SEM .5 cr
Admission to this class is based on playing experience and placement audition. Intermediate Guitar is a course designed for those with a basic understanding of classical guitar playing. The focus of this class is on more advanced classical guitar music and techniques. A mixture of older traditional songs and more contemporary pop tunes are used to further educate the student on the proper methods of playing. Music theory and history are taught as well.

6390 ADVANCED GUITAR ENSEMBLE
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Admission to this course is based upon playing experience and audition with the instructor. Participants in this year-long course perform frequently in various contexts, including large ensemble, small ensemble, and individual performances, both in and outside of school. The focus of the course is to further the performance skills of students through study of classical guitar technique, literature, and history. This class meets after school.

6574 MEN’S CHORUS
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
6573 MEN’S CHORUS HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
The men’s chorus is open to all interested 9-12 grade men of any level. The men’s chorus performs repertoire from a variety of musical styles, cultures, and historical periods. Students study introductory vocal technique, music theory, music literacy, and performance practice while developing skills as independent musicians. The men’s and women’s choruses join to form the concert choir for select performances. Auditions for honors level chorus are held in the spring semester.

6578 WOMEN’S CHORUS
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
6579 WOMEN’S CHORUS HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
The women’s chorus is open to all interested 9-12 grade women of any level. The women’s chorus performs repertoire from a variety of musical styles, cultures, and historical periods. Students study introductory vocal technique, music theory, music literacy, and performance practice while developing skills as independent musicians. The women’s and men’s choruses join to form the concert choir for select performances. Auditions for honors level chorus are held in the spring semester.

6585 O’CONNELL SINGERS HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Prior choral singing experience; audition with course instructor.
The O’Connell Singers is an honors level, select women’s chamber choir. The choir is open to highly qualified students through audition. The O’Connell Singers perform repertoire from a variety of musical styles, cultures, and historical periods. Students study advanced choral technique, music theory, and performance practice while developing skills as independent musicians. The O’Connell Singers fulfill a rigorous performance schedule including concerts outside of the Bishop O’Connell community. Students are expected to have a secure knowledge of vocal production, music literacy, and basic music theory before participating in this choir.

6650 AP MUSIC THEORY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: One year of vocal or instrumental class or ensemble.
This course is offered to students who have a strong foundation in music. Successful completion of a preparatory summer assignment is required. Students work at a college pace mastering musical rudiments such as notation, intervals, scales and keys, chords, metric organization, and rhythmic patterns. Students work on aural skills, compositional skills, sight-singing skills, and analytical skills as they apply to music theory. Students are required to take the AP Music Theory exam in May.

6660 SURVEY OF WORLD MUSIC
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course explores the classical and folk music of different world cultures. Students are challenged to identify the characteristics of the types of music studied and to understand how music is viewed in different cultures. Course curriculum includes reading, listening and writing assignments related to the music being studied. In addition, learning and playing a variety of world drums and instruments are explored. Students have the opportunity to learn the basics of playing world instruments. Students must have access to a computer with Internet capability as listening is assigned from internet sources.

6665 SURVEY OF AMERICAN MUSIC
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course explores the development of classical and folk music in the United States. Students are challenged to identify the characteristics of Native American music, colonial music, a variety of folk music in American history including slave songs, classical music, the blues, jazz, country and western, rock and funk. Course curriculum includes reading, listening and writing assignments related to the music being studied. Students must have access to a computer with Internet capability as listening is assigned from Internet sources. This class also serves as an elective credit in social studies. A section of this class is offered in the summer for an additional fee.

6595 MUSIC AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
9-12 SEM .5 cr This course focuses on how technology has affected music performance, reproduction, and distribution. Students learn recording technology methods including live and studio recording techniques and remixing. They learn computer-based notation, sound sampling, and electronic music production and have the opportunity to utilize beat making and midi technology. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

MEDIA AND DRAMA

6700 INTRO TO FILM
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This elective course presents an in-depth treatment of film as a powerful 20th and 21st century art form. Students become familiar with film language and technique, study the history of American film, and critique numerous films using the knowledge they acquire through viewing clips from the greatest movies made, as well as from full-length presentations. The course requires discussion and critical writing. Topics to be discussed include: photography, sets/ settings, movement, editing, sound, acting, drama, story, writing, ideology and theory. This class also serves as an elective in English.

6810 AUDIO & VIDEO PRODUCTION I
10-12 SEM .5 cr
In this course, students learn the fundamentals of audio and digital video production concepts and techniques. The course covers all aspects of production, including creating and editing an audio track, developing an idea into a plot and video script, storyboarding, coordinating all necessary actors, lighting, settings and props, filming, directing, and ultimately editing a finished product, using current audio and video sound editing applications (Adobe CC, iMovie, Smoke, Movie Maker, Audacity, etc.). A minimum of four audio projects/digital shorts be produced, culminating in a final combo-project completed by each individual student.

6920 ACTING
9-12 SEM .5 cr
This acting class focuses on basic acting techniques such as improvisations, pantomime, mime, voice, diction, beginning characterization, and scene study. Exercises include monologues and group scene work. Students become acquainted with the responsibilities of a producer and director, as well as set, lighting, costume, and makeup designers.

6930 THEATER TECHNOLOGY
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This semester course explores the ways that changing technology of theater affects scenography, the coordinated design of scenery, lights, costumes, and other technical aspects of stagecraft. Students learn the vocabulary of equipment, the properties of modern scene materials, the advances in technological fields, and the professional standards in design and technology. In addition, a hands-on laboratory component is part of the course: Students help design and execute the technological aspects of the acting classes’ and drama club’s productions.

Health & Physical Education

8115 HEALTH 1 (GIRLS)
9 SEM .5 cr
8015 HEALTH 1 (BOYS)
9 SEM .5 cr
This semester course is designed to take a holistic approach to human health. It is based on the conviction that the human person is a unified totality and personal well-being consists in the proper integration of physical, emotional, mental, social and moral life. From this perspective, the course seeks to investigate both the positive development of human well-being and certain behaviors which threaten this development. Topics to be studied include: basic factors in physical, mental, emotional and moral health; nutrition and fitness; CPR; harmful effect of drugs, steroids, and alcohol; sexual health and disease and benefits of a healthy active lifestyle. This course is required for all students and is available in the summer (#S815) for an additional fee.

8111 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1/INTRO TO TEAM SPORTS (GIRLS)
9 SEM .5 cr
8011 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1/INTRO TO TEAM SPORTS (BOYS)
9 SEM .5 cr
This course includes a variety of team and individual activities to meet the student’s present need for fitness and physical activity. Students are provided with knowledge of fitness components, basic rules and history, and skilled movements related to selected sports. Students will also learn the process of self-analysis related to skills in each unit and will abide by a code of sportsmanship in all settings.
(E800) An early bird section of Health (8125) & Physical Education 1 (8025) meets daily at 6:45 a.m. during the school year. There is no additional fee for this before-school class.

S800 HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1
9 1.0 cr
This is a summer course
that combines Health 1 and PE 1. It requires an additional fee.
This course emphasizes the development of healthy active lifestyle. Health includes selected systems of the body and their related health issues; alcohol, drugs and tobacco; infectious disease; nutrition, stress, and fitness and a unit on the implication of “bullying.” Physical Education includes a variety of team and individual activities to meet the student’s present need for fitness and physical activity as well as introducing activities that can be continued later as part of a healthy lifestyle.

8225 DRIVER EDUCATION WITH FIRST AID AND CURRENT ISSUES
10-11 SEM .5cr
This course includes classroom driver education instruction (36 hours) which covers all aspects of safe and responsible use of a motor vehicle. Opportunity is provided for parents to attend a state-required parent meeting. Other topics included in the course are first aid and current issues such as concussion protocol.

8228 DRIVER EDUCATION WITH PHYSICAL EDUCATION
10-11 SEM .5 cr
This course consists of classroom driver education instruction (36 hours) which will cover aspects of safe and responsible use of a motor vehicle. Opportunity is provided for parents to attend a Virginia-required parent meeting. The co-ed physical education portion of the course provides students with the opportunity to take part in team activities as well as to maintain their physical fitness.

S801 DRIVER EDUCATION WITH FIRST AID AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2
10 1.0 cr
This is a summer course
and requires an additional fee.
This course includes classroom Driver Education (36 hours) and First Aid instruction. The Physical Education portion of this course includes a variety of team and individual activities to meet the individual’s present need for fitness and physical activity as well as introducing activities that can be continued later as part of healthy lifestyle.
(E801) An early bird section of this course meets daily at 6:45 a.m. during the school year. There is no additional fee for this before-school class.

IN CAR DRIVER EDUCATION
10-12 0.0 cr
In-Car Driver Education is offered in the summer and during the school year on a first come, first-served basis. A fee is charged for this instruction. No credit is offered for these sessions.

8350 LIFETIME AND INDIVIDUAL SPORTS
10-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisite: PE 1/Introduction to Team Sports or equivalent.
This course includes continued learning of motor skills related to more team and individual sports such as track and field, tennis, ultimate frisbee, flag football, badminton, soccer, volleyball, basketball, and bowling. The course will provide opportunities to foster leadership attributes, strategic play, sportsmanship, and statistic/ record keeping aspects among the sport activities.

8445 WEIGHT TRAINING
10-12 SEM .5cr
This course emphasizes self-improvement and will enhance the student’s knowledge of physiology, endurance, and strength development. Techniques and form for weight lifting will be emphasized as students are given daily class opportunities to establish personal goals that are tracked and monitored for learning the elements of exercise program design and to allow students to demonstrate marked improvement throughout the semester.

8300 SPORTS MEDICINE
10-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA and permission of the instructor.
This course is an introduction to the many aspects of sports medicine. Instruction on common injuries to all parts of the body composes the core of the course. Many non-injury topics are also covered such as sport nutrition, drug abuse in sports, sport psychology, medical conditions and sports participation, sports performance enhancement, and exercise in heat and cold. Careers in sports medicine and an introduction to current literature are also included.

8448 PERSONAL FITNESS FOR ATHLETES
10-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: PE 1/Introduction to Team Sports or participation in a varsity sport.
This course is designed to help student athletes who are participating in a school sport develop personal health and skill goals. Besides athletic team preparation, this course consists of group conditioning, strength training, and other athletic skills. The emphasis of the class will be on improving the overall fitness of each athlete by supplying all students with an in-depth understanding of fitness components and techniques used in exercise prescription for health, fitness for the skills appropriate for each athlete, education on basic nutrition principles for athletes, and hands-on experiences to build personal programs to train for each individual sport.

8000 TEAM SPORT PARTICIPATION AND COMPETITION
9-12 0.0 cr
Physical Education requirements may be met through participation on athletic teams. Requirements for one semester of physical education are waived for participation in two seasons of school-sponsored sports.

Mathematics

3180 ALGEBRA 1
9 YR 1.0 cr
This course covers fundamental algebra. Topics include: the language of algebra; properties of real numbers; solving equations and inequalities in one and two variables; multiplying and factoring algebraic numbers; rational numbers and irrational numbers; solving equations involving rational and irrational numbers; solving systems of linear equations and linear inequalities and their graphs; simplifying radical terms, and solving equations by factoring. Word problems concerning distance, rate and time, percentages, interest, geometric figures, and number problems are taught as they occur in the text. Students are introduced to the graphing calculator with linear equations and solving systems of linear equations. Extensive practice problems are included to solidify concepts. NCAA

3109 ALGEBRA 1/A
9 YR 1.0 cr
This course covers fundamental algebra in-depth. Topics include: the language of algebra; properties of real numbers; solving equations and inequalities in one and two variables; multiplying and factoring algebraic numbers; rational numbers and irrational numbers; solving equations involving rational and irrational numbers; solving systems of linear equations and linear inequalities and their graphs; simplifying radical terms, and solving equations by factoring. Word problems concerning distance, rate and time, percentages, interest, geometric figures, and number problems are taught as they occur in the text. Students are introduced to the graphing calculator with linear equations and solving systems of linear equations. This course is the equivalent to 3110 Algebra 1/A with the exception that students are placed in the course based on testing and previous background in Algebra. NCAA

3110 ALGEBRA 1/A
9 YR 1.0 cr
This course covers fundamental algebra in-depth. Topics include: the language of algebra; properties of real numbers; solving equations and inequalities in one and two variables; multiplying and factoring algebraic numbers; rational numbers and irrational numbers; solving equations involving rational and irrational numbers; solving systems of linear equations and linear inequalities and their graphs; simplifying radical terms, and solving equations by factoring. Word problems concerning distance, rate and time, percentages, interest, geometric figures, and number problems are taught as they occur in the text. Students are introduced to the graphing calculator with linear equations and solving systems of linear equations. The class is paced so that students can enter an honors class in tenth grade or continue the four-year college-prep mathematics program. NCAA

3309 ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY
9 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Completion of Algebra 1 and qualifying score on the Diocesan Algebra Exemption Exam.
Beginning with a review of the basics of first-year algebra, the students are led to a more detailed study of the polynomial and the concept of functions. Topics that are presented for study include exponents, radicals, factoring, rational expressions, quadratic equations, and complex numbers. The fundamentals of trigonometry are presented in the fourth quarter. Placement in this course is based upon the results of the Diocesan Algebra Exemption Exam. NCAA

3350 ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY HONORS
9-11 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Geometry Honors; A in Geometry/A; or department approval. For freshmen, placement in this course is based on the results of the Diocesan Algebra Exemption Exam or HSPT Math scores >=90 and A in Algebra 1.
This course begins with a review of the basic concepts of first/ year algebra followed by the topics of Algebra 2. These topics include: linear functions and relations, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, quadratic functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, polynomial functions, rational and radical functions, statistics and conic sections. The study of trigonometry, which takes place in the fourth quarter includes radian measure, trigonometric functions and identities, and solving general triangles. NCAA

3280 GEOMETRY
10 YR 1.0 cr
This course is an axiomatic approach to the basic theorems of Euclidean geometry. It uses an integrated approach to the study of plane and solid geometry, including proofs. A study of the areas and volumes of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures is included in the course. A thorough study of the right triangle is taught as a brief introduction to trigonometry. This is a complete course in geometry using hands-on work to discover the concepts of geometry. NCAA

3220 GEOMETRY/A
10 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: C or higher in Algebra 1/A.
This course is an axiomatic approach to the basic theorems of Euclidean geometry. It uses an integrated approach to the study of plane and solid geometry, including proofs. Included in the course is a study of the areas and volumes of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures. A thorough study of the right triangle is taught as a brief introduction to trigonometry. NCAA

3230 GEOMETRY HONORS
10 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in Algebra2/Trig Honors; B+ or higher in Algebra2/Trig; A+ in Algebra 1/A; or department approval.
This course is an axiomatic approach to the basic theorems of Euclidean geometry. It uses an integrated approach to the study of plane and solid geometry, including proofs. Included in the course is a study of the areas and volumes of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures. A thorough study of the right triangle is taught as a brief introduction to trigonometry. This course is taught at a rigorous pace with significant emphasis on proofs. Course content also includes construction, loci, coordinate geometry, and transformations. NCAA

3380 ALGEBRA 2
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry.
This course is required for students who have completed Algebra 1 and Geometry and do not meet the prerequisites for Algebra 2/Trig. Building upon the basic elements of first year algebra, this course develops a full range of Algebra 2 concepts. Topics include polynomials and the concept of functions, exponents, radicals, factoring, rational expressions, quadratic equations, complex numbers, conic sections, probability, and an introduction to the basic elements of trigonometry. NCAA

3300 ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY
10-11 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Geometry/A; A in Geometry; or department approval.
Beginning with a review of the basics of first-year algebra, the students are led to a more detailed study of the polynomial and the concept of functions. Topics that are presented for study include exponents, radicals, factoring, rational expressions, quadratic equations, and complex numbers. The fundamentals of trigonometry are presented in the fourth quarter. NCAA

3400 COLLEGE MATH TOPICS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Geometry and Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
This course is designed to introduce students to new concepts in mathematics including right triangle trigonometry, set theory, logic, number representation and probability. Students improve upon skills previously acquired in Algebra 1, Algebra II and Geometry through application to practical problems that model “real world” challenges. Students continue to develop their mathematical skills in problem solving, inductive and deductive reasoning, voting and apportionment methods, graphing, mathematical modeling, number theory, and linear programming. This is a course primarily designed for seniors who wish to apply their mathematical skills in science, business, financial management, statistics and surveys. NCAA

3410 PRE-CALCULUS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Algebra 2/Trig; A in Algebra 2; or department approval.
This course is intended for students who wish to continue a college prep math curriculum beyond Algebra 2/Trig and subsequently take a calculus course. Topics covered are: a review of linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions and their inverses, conic sections, exponents and logarithms and trigonometry with a concentration on radian measure, series, sequences, limits, and combinatorics. NCAA

3450 PRE-CALCULUS HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Algebra 2/Trig Honors; A+ in Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
This course is designed for the student who wishes to continue a college prep curriculum and subsequently take an AP or Honors Calculus course. Topics include a review of linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions and inverses, exponents and logarithms, trigonometry, probability, series, sequences, limits and graphing techniques using transformations, and combinatorics. This course is enriched with an introduction to derivatives. Emphasis is divided between theory and problem solving. NCAA

3510 CALCULUS HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in Pre-Calculus; C or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors; or department approval.
This course is intended for the student who would like an introduction to calculus without the pressure of an Advanced Placement pace. Without the need for an extended review to prepare for the AP exam, this course covers all the computational skills and applications of Calculus AB, but at a less rigorous pace. See 3350 AP Calculus AB for the list of skills and applications for this course. NCAA

3550 AP CALCULUS AB
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors or department approval.
This college level calculus course culminates with the Advanced Placement test in AB Calculus in May. The concepts of limits and continuity are developed into differential calculus, covering the derivative geometrically, numerically and analytically. Derivatives of trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and inverse functions, the chain rule, and implicit differentiation are studied. Applications of derivatives include curve analysis, related rates, growth and decay, and velocities and accelerations. Second semester topics include: integral calculus; the computations of various Riemann sums and applications of integral calculus including topics such as area between curves; rotations of solids and average value. In addition to the curriculum outlined by the College Board, this course is enriched with additional calculus topics. All students must take the AP Calculus AB exam in May. A graphing calculator is required for this course and for the AP exam. A summer project reviewing pre-calculus topics is also required. NCAA

3560 AP CALCULUS BC
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: C or higher in Calculus AB; B- or higher in Calculus Honors; A+ in Pre- Calculus Honors; or department approval.
This college level calculus course culminates with the Advanced Placement test in Calculus BC in May The concept of differential calculus is developed, including the derivatives of polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and their inverses are studied. Rules for differentiation and applications of derivatives are studied, including the chain rule, implicit differentiation, curve analysis, related rates, growth and decay, and kinematics. Numerical methods such as Euler’s method and Newton’s method are also covered. Second semester topics include: integral calculus and applications of integral calculus including topics such as area between curves; rotations of solids and average value of a function. Numerical integration methods such as Riemann sums are also presented. Additionally, the course includes multivariable calculus, vector calculus, Taylor and Maclaurin series representations of functions, and polar curves. All students must take the AP Calculus BC exam in May. For any student enrolled in AP Physics C, it is highly recommended to enroll in AP Calculus BC concurrently. A graphing calculator is required for this course and for the AP exam. A summer project reviewing pre-calculus topics is also required. NCAA

3570 MULTIVARIATE CALCULUS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr.
Prerequisites: B or higher in Calculus BC; A in Calculus AB; or department approval. Students from Calculus AB must score 4 or 5 in the AP Calculus AB exam. Students not achieving those scores will be scheduled for AP Calculus BC.
This honors level study of multivariable calculus includes a review of Calculus BC topics not studied in Calculus AB; Taylor and Maclaurin series, polar curves and vector/ parametric calculus. The course also includes elementary three-dimensional geometry, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and computations using Green’s and Stokes’ theorems. Students are introduced to the appropriate use of computer algebra software to create three-dimensional graphs and to perform difficult numerical integration. A TI-83, TI-84 or any of the college board approved TI-Nspire graphing calculators is required. NCAA

3600 STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Algebra 2/Trig; C or higher in Pre-Calculus; or department approval.
An introduction to probability and statistics at a pre-calculus level, this course provides an opportunity to explore and understand the statistics encountered daily in life. Emphasis is on basic concepts including organizing and displaying data, averages and variation, probability theory, binomial probability distribution, normal and sampling distribution, estimation and hypothesis testing. Statistics involves applied mathematics with meaningful problems preparing the student for all fields of college study. This course is available for dual credit through Marymount University. NCAA

3650 AP STATISTICS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Pre-Calculus; B- or higher in Pre-Calculus Honors; or department approval.
This college level, pre-calculus-based statistics course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course culminates with the Advanced Placement Test in Statistics in May. The students interpret univariate data, explore bivariate data, and learn probability theory, the normal curve, confidence intervals, and tests of significance, adhering to the curriculum outlined by the College Board. NCAA

Science

4200 BIOLOGY 1
9-10 YR 1.0 cr
Biology 1 is a lab-based introductory college preparatory course that emphasizes the following major areas of study: (1) An introduction to the basic structure, function, and chemistry of living organisms; (2) Continuity of life through genetics and history of life through an understanding of evolution; (3) Diversity of life from bacteria to green plants and from protozoa to humans; (4) The interdependency of organisms and their environment; (5) Overview of human processes and interrelation of other species and the environment. Labs and computer-based activities are an integral part of this course. NCAA

4210 BIOLOGY 1 HONORS
9-10 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: HSPT Composite >= 90 with an A in Science 8 and satisfactory grade in Algebra 1; or departmental approval.
Biology 1 Honors is a course intended for students who exhibit an above average interest and ability in science and a sufficient level of academic maturity. This is an introductory course which utilizes the molecular approach to the study of biology. A current, comprehensive background of biology is presented so that the student may make intelligent decisions concerning topics such as growth and development, evolution, genetic engineering, cellular energy, and DNA. The course relies heavily on daily readings and study and includes laboratory experiences with emphasis on experimental design, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. NCAA

4000 INTEGRATED BIOLOGY AND ENGLISH (IBE)
9 YR 2.0 cr
Prerequisites: Students must meet qualifications for Biology I Honors.
IBE is an interdisciplinary course that integrates Biology 1 Honors (4210) and English I (1100) with an authentic community-based field research program. The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, drama and non-fiction selections. This course is designed for students with above average academic maturity and ability, a strong interest in both science and effective communication, and a commitment to a collaborative work ethic. This Honors Biology/English 9 integration links the two courses through an on-going research project, at the same time preserving the distinctive components of each discipline. Students earn 1.0 credit in Biology 1 Honors (4210) and 1.0 credit in English 1 (1100).

The Biology 1 Honors (4210) component of this course emphasizes the molecular approach to the study of biology including chemistry for biology students, cell biology, bioenergetics, heredity, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, diversity of organisms, and ecology as major units of study. A current, comprehensive background of biology is presented. The course relies heavily on daily readings and study and includes laboratory experiences with emphasis on experimental design, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.

The English 1 (1100) component of this course includes instruction in both language skills and literature. The literature program introduces students to the various literary genres, providing study in the epic, short story, novel, poetry, and drama. The course emphasizes critical reading and critical thinking skills, supplementing the college prep English 1 experience with opportunities for technical writing and research. Vocabulary study is stressed and is taken from the reading, as well as supplementary sources. NCAA

4300 CHEMISTRY
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: C or higher in Biology; B or higher in Algebra 1/A; A- in Algebra 1; successful completion of Algebra2/Trig; or department approval.
This is an introductory general chemistry course designed for a well-rounded liberal arts education. The composition and behavior of matter and energy are the focus. Students are expected to develop problem-solving skills which are both mathematical and conceptual. Laboratory experiences are designed to enhance and reinforce classroom instruction. NCAA

4350 CHEMISTRY HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Biology Honors; A in Biology with B or higher in Algebra 2/ Trig Honors or B+ or higher in Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
This course is a college preparatory introduction to the study of matter which emphasizes conceptual understanding as well as in-depth mathematical problem- solving. The course curriculum includes: states of matter, kinetics, equilibrium, atomic theory, acids and bases, and other selected topics. Additional time is scheduled for laboratory experiences to support classroom instruction, to practice inductive reasoning skills, to develop concepts of experimental design; and to emphasize data collection and report writing skills. Students are expected to develop and apply analytical thinking and communication skills to theoretical and applied aspects of chemistry. A graphing calculator is required. NCAA

4400 PHYSICS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in Chemistry and B- or higher in Algebra 2/Trig; A- in Algebra 2 with concurrent enrollment in College Math Topics; or department approval.
This course presents the physics concepts that form a foundation for the studies of science, technology, and engineering and focuses on discovering relationships between facts and the patterns that exist in nature. Demonstrations, laboratory exercises, and problem solving using mathematical and graphical techniques are incorporated into these concepts. There is an emphasis on thinking and reasoning to solve problems and apply what has been learned. NCAA

4430 PHYSICS HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in Chemistry Honors and in Algebra 2/ Trig Honors; B+ or higher in Chemistry and Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
Honors provides a rigorous analysis of the main principles of classical and modern physics and emphasizes the development of critical thinking and problem-solving strategies. Mathematical reasoning, laboratory experiences, some computer-based, and calculator graphing and programming are utilized in the development of the principles involved and the ability to apply these principles in the solution of problems. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, work, energy, waves, light and optics, mechanics, and electricity. A programmable graphing calculator is required. NCAA

4460 AP PHYSICS 1
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Chemistry Honors and Algebra 2/ Trig Honors; A- in Chemistry and Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion), work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry- based learning, students develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students are required to take the AP College Board Physics 1 exam in May. Graphing calculators are required. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation. NCAA

4470 AP PHYSICS 2
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: C or higher in AP Physics 1; B or higher in Physics Honors; or department approval. Co-requisite: Pre-Calculus Honors (3450) or Calculus (3510, 3550, 3560).
AP Physics 2 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course that explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics with kinetic theory; pressure/ volume diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students are required to take the AP College Board Physics 2 exam in May. Graphing calculators are required. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation. NCAA

4490 AP PHYSICS C
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in AP Physics 1; B+ or higher in Physics Honors (4430); or department approval. Co-requisite: Calculus (3510, 3550, 3560, 3570).
Advanced Placement Physics C is designed as a follow-up to an introductory physics course. The curriculum is equivalent to a first year college-level physics course for those students majoring in science and engineering. Emphasis is placed on advanced techniques of problem-solving, including the use of calculus. Students are required to take the two AP College Board Physics C exams in May. NCAA

4250 AP BIOLOGY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Biology Honors and B in Chemistry Honors; A- in Biology and B+ in Chemistry; department approval. Rising sophomores may be invited by the science department to schedule AP Biology with Chemistry Honors based on commitment to a strong work ethic, consistently high grades (A- in Biology Honors, B+ in Algebra 2/ Trig Honors, or A- in Algebra 2/Trig), and advanced lab skills.
The AP Biology curriculum encompasses “four big ideas”: evolution, cellular processes, genetics, and interactions” with essential knowledge and process skills that support each one. AP Biology is a rigorous and demanding course which is equivalent to a full-year introductory college biology course. Content is covered in depth with strong emphasis on scientific process and analytical thinking. In addition, statistical analysis of data and modeling of concepts is expected. Labs, analytical discussion of results, and inquiry during class sessions require significant amounts of study and preparation beyond class time. Students are required to take the AP College Board Biology exam in May. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation. NCAA

4370 AP CHEMISTRY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Chemistry Honors and Algebra 2/Trig Honors; or department approval.
Co-requisite: AP Physics or Honors Physics.
The AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, in their first year, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses. There is a strong emphasis on independent reading and study as well as on laboratory skills. The course provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal with the rapidly evolving science of chemistry. Students are required to take the AP College Board Chemistry exam in May. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation. NCAA

4290 AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Biology and in Chemistry; or department approval. Co-requisite: Physics, Physics Honors, or AP Physics 1.
This college level interdisciplinary course integrates scientific principles of chemistry, biology, and earth science to understand interrelationships of the natural world. The class explores topics such as ecology, populations, resource use, pollution, and biodiversity. Environmental problems, both natural and man-made, are identified and analyzed in classroom lectures, labs, field work, and independent projects. This course prepares students for the required AP Environmental Science exam in May. NCAA

4270 ECOLOGY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry.
In Ecology, students study how populations of organisms are affected by competing organisms, symbiotic relationships, predator/ prey interactions, evolutionary changes, and interactions with humans. Unique characteristics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are examined including plant and animal species, ecosystem services, and primary productivity. Students learn how humans have affected ecosystems and what conservation efforts are being undertaken to preserve the Earth’s biodiversity. During fourth quarter, students focus in greater detail on local ecosystems by studying the characteristics of Eastern forests and learning to identify local tree and animal species. NCAA

4500 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of Biology and Chemistry.
Anatomy and physiology is the study of the structure and function of the body. The course begins with a review of basic cell concepts, including cell structure, cell reproduction, and protein synthesis. The class then examines major tissue types before discussing each of the organ systems in detail. Health issues such as immunity, common genetic disorders, and cancer are also investigated. Projects and laboratory activities enhance the learning experience. NCAA

4530 ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Chemistry with a B or higher in Biology Honors or an A in Biology 1; or department approval.
This course is designed for students who have demonstrated an above average proficiency in previous science courses. Anatomy and physiology is the study of the structure and function of the body. The course begins with a review of basic cell concepts, including cell structure, cell reproduction, and protein synthesis. The class then examines major tissue types before discussing each of the organ systems in detail. Health issues such as immunity, common genetic disorders, and cancer are also investigated. This course requires a significant amount of additional reading and the completion of several in-depth projects and laboratory activities. NCAA

4600 FORENSIC SCIENCE
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Chemistry with a B or higher in Biology Honors or an A in Biology 1; or department approval.
Co-requisite: Physics, Physics Honors, or AP Physics 1.
Forensic Science is a multidisciplinary laboratory program that incorporates concepts in many areas of science including chemistry, zoology, anatomy, genetics, physics, medicine, math and statistics, sociology, ethics, law, psychology, and communications. Students study a wide range of forensic disciplines with an emphasis on the practical application of scientific principles in the laboratory. Students are trained to evaluate physical evidence and findings by applying the scientific method. Students must then be prepared to defend conclusions based on their own empirical evidence. NCAA

4655 GENETICS HONORS
11-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Biology Honors or A- or higher in Biology; B or higher in Chemistry Honors or A- or higher in Chemistry; or department approval.
Genetics is the study of inheritance and how genes act to produce the characteristics of a living organism. In this course, students learn about the principles of inheritance. Genetics is a laboratory class that emphasizes problem-solving, decision-making, and critical thinking. Emphasis is placed on the (1) molecular basis of heredity, (2) molecular structure and replication of genetic material, (3) patterns of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, (4) genetic diseases, and (5) biotechnological applications. Related bioethical questions are discussed as they arise.

4620 INTRO TO ENGINEERING DESIGN
9 -12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 1; or department approval. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Biology 1.
Introduction to Engineering Design is a course that focuses on the process of engineering design and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply STEM concepts, understand important standards in the various fields of engineering, and document their work in solving engineering-based problems. Students use industry standard 3-D modeling software to design solutions as well as an engineer notebook for the recording of all data. Students conclude projects by presenting their work to peers and faculty members. Ninth graders may enroll in this course as a second science with department permission. This course fulfills the computer requirement of graduation.

4665 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: C or higher in Algebra 2/Trig.
Co-requisite: Physics or department approval.
This course emphasizes the underlying principles of engineering and technology. Students apply STEM concepts to real-world problems to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills in four engineering disciplines: civil, mechanical, electrical, and aerospace engineering. Students improve their use of mathematical analysis, computer simulations, and scientific method. Engineers often work as part of a team to plan, design, and supervise the development of a project from conception through completion. This course emphasizes project work and team-based assignments. It is intended for students with strong STEM skills who have an interest in engineering as a career. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation. NCAA

4675 CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Completion of Introduction to Engineering Design or Principles of Engineering; C or higher in Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
Students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present project results to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. This course emphasizes project work and team-based assignments. It is intended for students with strong STEM skills who have an interest in engineering or architecture as a career. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

4700 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: Approval from department chairperson and Independent Research Coordinator.
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to perform in-depth scientific research on a particular topic. Emphasis is placed on experimental design, laboratory skills, library research, and computer technology. Appropriate forms of statistical analysis are taught and utilized for research purposes. Students are required to produce a project/paper for submission to regional science fairs, the Virginia Junior Academy of Science, and competitions such as Intel and Toshiba. Networking with area universities and scientific agencies is encouraged. This elective course does not fulfill the science requirements for graduation.

Social Studies

5100 WORLD HISTORY
9 YR 1.0 cr
World History is a survey course covering the major political, economic, social, religious, and cultural developments of the peoples of the world. The course is presented chronologically, beginning with prehistoric times and continuing into modern times. Emphasis is placed on the development of Western civilization, but students are also introduced to the major achievements of non-Western civilizations and cultures woven into the continuing development of humanity. Social studies skills such as analysis, interpretation, and evaluation are explored and practiced by the students. NCAA

5150 WORLD HISTORY HONORS
9 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: HSPT verbal and reading scores >= 90 and satisfactory grade in 8th grade social studies; or department review of a writing sample and HSPT reading scores.
This course provides students with a challenging and stimulating view of world history. Beginning with human origins and the earliest civilizations, the course develops an in-depth knowledge of the human presence in the world along the path of history through the present. Emphasis is placed on the development of Western civilization, but students are also introduced to the major achievements of non-Western civilizations and cultures woven into the continuing development of humanity. Instructional format is multifaceted with the use of lectures, questioning and exchange, independent research using the Internet, and frequent written assignments (projects and papers) based on the student’s research. NCAA

5175 WORLD GEOGRAPHY
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Completion of World History or World History Honors.
This course focuses on the world’s peoples, places, and environments. The knowledge, skills, and perspectives of the course are centered on the world’s peoples and their cultural characteristics, landforms and climates, economic development, and migration and settlement patterns. Spatial concepts of geography are used as a framework for studying interactions between humans and their environments. Using geographic resources and current events, students employ inquiry, research, and technology skills to ask and answer geographic questions. Particular emphasis is placed on students’ understanding and applying geographic concepts and skills to their daily lives. NCAA

5255 MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in World History or B or higher in World History Honors; and B or higher in current English class; or department approval.
This course studies European history from the origins of the Renaissance to the fall of Eastern European communism, the reunification of Germany, and the movement to create a united Europe. Emphasis is placed on analysis of primary source materials, development of analytical reading skills, coherent essay writing, and independent thought and study skills. Students engage ideas and themes in a variety of ways including project-based learning and guided research. NCAA

5250 AP MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY
10 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: A+ in World History or B+ or higher in World History Honors; and B+ or higher in current English class; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
The course studies the history of Europe from the origins of the Renaissance to the fall of Eastern European communism, the reunification of Germany, and the movement to the creation of a united Europe. Emphasis is placed on analysis of primary source materials, development of analytical reading skills, coherent essay writing, and independent thought and study skills. All students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP European History exam in May. The completion of a summer project is required by the beginning of school. NCAA

5965 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMICS
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This multi-faceted economics course emphasizes real-world applications. Lessons are designed and developed to give students an opportunity to examine principles of economics and business. Students are instructed in the basic tenets of the American free enterprise system and explore its place in the larger global market. Work on computer simulations relating to both micro and macroeconomics is an integral part of the course work. NCAA

5280 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This is a survey course of African American history. Topics include accomplishments of African civilizations before first contact with Europeans, the trans-Atlantic slave trade (including its impact on the world economy), slavery, African Americans in the Civil War, the abolition of slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow and segregation, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights revolution, and contemporary issues in the African American community, including the achievement gap, the wage gap, housing discrimination, and overrepresentation/injustices in the criminal justice system. Students also discuss and elaborate on the cultural, religious, and economic contributions that African Americans have made in the modern world. NCAA

5180 THE DEVELOPING WORLD
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course focuses on the study of the “developing world,” a broad, fluid term meant to encompass a wide range of countries that are emerging into the modern, industrial present as a byproduct of globalization. These countries are widely varying in geographic location, size, economy, religion and politics; but they share common features. Most face conditions such as extreme poverty, high rates of population growth, gender inequality, political instability and economic dependence on the industrial countries of the northern hemisphere. Importantly, most of the world is developing. Two-thirds of the world’s countries and nearly 80% of its population live in the developing world. Students benefit from knowledge of a world that is becoming increasingly interdependent. NCAA

5285 WOMEN’S HISTORY IN THE UNITED STATES
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This semester course examines U.S. history with an emphasis on the American woman’s perspective and experience. Topics include, but are not limited to, gender roles in the colonial period, women at war, the suffragist movement, the progressive era, and women’s place in America today. Of particular interest is the driving essential question: how do women encounter the American Dream? How is success defined, how does opportunity awaken, what does equality look like? These essential questions and topics are designed to help students elicit a deeper understanding of the women’s perspective in America. Students taking this class encounter the varied voices of America through dialogue, current events, various field trips, and group discussion.

5287 U.S. CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course examines civil rights and liberties in the United States, especially relating to Asian Americans, African Americans, Hispanics, women, the disabled, and various religious groups. Topics include but are not limited to Constitutional freedoms (i.e. speech, press, religion, assembly, petition), the rights of the accused, and the rights of the disabled. Leaders in the field of civil rights and civil liberties also be studied. Students develop a deeper interest in and understanding of these civil rights and liberties by using the text, online sources, class discussions and essays. Student participation and group discussion play important roles in the class. NCAA

5300 U.S. AND VIRGINIA HISTORY
11 YR 1.0 cr
United States and Virginia History is a survey course in American history with special emphasis on the history of Virginia. The course traces the development of the political, economic, religious, and social life of the people of the United States from the 15th century to the contemporary period. U.S. relations with foreign countries are explored. The positive influence of Judeo-Christian values in American life is emphasized. Geography is stressed as a factor in the complete understanding of the social development of the country. NCAA

5320 U.S. AND VIRGINIA HISTORY HONORS
11 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP Modern European History; B or higher in World History Honors; A in World History; B or higher in English; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course involves a study of the formative movements in the development of American civilization within a chronological framework. The course traces the development of the political, economic, religious, and social life of the people of the United States from the 15th century to the contemporary period, with special emphasis on the history of Virginia. Students can expect to use primary and secondary sources to analyze major themes. In addition, as an honors course, students focus on writing and research within the curriculum. Students also use current events, both foreign and domestic, as opportunities to independently research and formulate ideas. NCAA

5350 AP U.S. HISTORY
11 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP Modern European History or A- in World History Honors; and B+ or higher in English; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course involves a study of the formative movements in the development of American civilization within a chronological framework. Emphasis is placed on historiography, analysis of primary source materials, development of discriminatory reading powers, coherent essay writing and independent study skills. All students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP U.S. History exam in May. The completion of a summer project is required by the beginning of school. NCAA

5580 PSYCHOLOGY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: B or higher in current Social Studies class.
This course covers core concepts in psychology, emphasizing the use of the scientific method in social science research and the physiological bases of behavior. Topics covered in the first semester include the brain, sensation and perception, states of consciousness (sleep/dreams/hypnosis/daydreams), memory and learning. During the second semester the course covers human development, personality disorders, therapy and social psychology. Students should expect a rigorous curriculum based on systematic and scientific studies of challenging course material. NCAA

5590 AP PSYCHOLOGY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP Modern European History or AP U.S. History; or B+ or higher in U.S. History Honors or Modern European History Honors; or A in current Social Studies; B or higher in current English; or department approval.
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental process of human beings and other species. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Additionally, students study and implement the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. At the completion of the course, students are required to take the AP Psychology exam. NCAA

6049 AP ART HISTORY
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in English; or department approval.
What is art? This college level course explores the history of the art of the world from the prehistoric era to the present. The class addresses stylistic development and cultural values, as well as the historical context that influence artistic production and practice. The class uses an interdisciplinary approach to discuss style, content, meaning, patronage, faith, interpretation, context, and significance of works of art, preparing students for the AP Art History exam in May which all students enrolled in the class are required to take. The course includes one research paper. This course also satisfies the fine arts credit.

6860 HUMANITIES HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: B+ or higher in English.
This honors course presents artistic patterns of relationship from ancient Greece to the present among philosophy, literature, architecture, sculpture, painting and music–all in light of the major historical events of each period. Content focuses on the interrelationships between arts and ideas in the framework of their proper historical and cultural settings. This class also satisfies the fine arts credit. NCAA

5510 AP ECONOMICS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in current Social Studies class; B or higher in current Mathematics and English.
This is a full-year college first-year level course concentrating on an analytical rather than a descriptive approach to the principles of economics. The major aspects of macroeconomics are: economic models, inflation, unemployment, GDP accounting, aggregate demand/supply analysis, the banking system, monetary and fiscal policy and competing theories of income stabilization. The study of microeconomics includes: demand and supply, markets, price theory, elasticity, costs of the business firm, models of pure competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly, international trade and selected topics as time allows. Students are required to take both AP Economics exams administered by the College Board in May. NCAA

5190 AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
11-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP U.S. History or AP Modern European History; or A- in U.S. History Honors; or A+ in U.S. History; and B+ in current English course; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The course material and readings are comparable to college freshman level survey courses in geography. Students are required to take the Human Geography AP exam administered by the College Board in May. NCAA

5470 AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
11-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP U.S. History or AP Modern European History; or A- in U.S. History Honors; or A+ in U.S. History; and B+ in current English course; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global cultural and economic changes. The course covers six specific countries: China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. This study of culture and politics is intellectually challenging and readings are at the college level. Students are required to take the Comparative Government AP exam administered by the College Board in May. NCAA

5760 ISSUES FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This course is an introduction to significant events in the 21st century. Students investigate cause, effect, and change in places across the world. One principal aim of the course is for students to develop a better understanding of the response of traditional societies to the impact of modernization on their values and customs. Another is to examine ideological conflicts of the modern world. Students also research contemporary problems that originated in the 21st century that demand creative and thoughtful solutions. Analytical skills, synthesis of conflicting viewpoints, conducting research, participating in deliberations and writing historical essays are all emphasized in this course. NCAA

5515 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
11-12 SEM .5 c
Prerequisites: B or higher in World History or World History Honors.
In society today decisions in one part of the world impact others thousands of miles away. This course introduces students to the interrelationships between the business and economic practices of countries. Topics include globalization, ethics, investment, marketing, and trade issues. Students consider the decisions made by companies when expanding their operations globally and how they must adapt to local business customs and practices. Current events from around the world and the use of computer applications are an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

5620 CRIMINAL JUSTICE
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This course is designed to provide junior and senior students with basic knowledge of the United States criminal justice system. It is a broad course touching on a variety of subjects within the field. Topics include, but are not limited to, corrections, the ethics of law enforcement, search & seizure, police operations, criminal procedure, theories of criminal behavior, criminal investigations and court proceedings. Students enjoy guest speakers and take field trips to relevant local sites. NCAA

5405 U.S. GOVERNMENT WITH FOREIGN AFFAIRS
12 YR 1.0 cr
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. This course satisfies the government requirements while giving students a deeper knowledge and understanding of the role of the United States in global affairs. Students use their knowledge of the executive branch and the U.S. State Department to explore current events, focusing on global crises and the American social, political and military response. Topics include current events, recent conflicts, domestic perspectives, and diplomatic relations. The second semester includes guest speakers, field trips, and lively discussion- based seminars. Students can expect to engage in both ongoing relevant issues as well as those from the recent past. NCAA

5415 U. S. GOVERNMENT WITH ADVOCACY AND PUBLIC POLICY
12 YR 1.0 cr
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. This course satisfies the government requirements while giving students a deeper knowledge and understanding of effective advocacy and democratic participation. Students explore each level of government while focusing on gaining access to the policy process with the goal of affecting change. Participants gain basic skills in grassroots mobilization, lobbying and negotiation. This is a student-driven, project-based course in which members hear from expert guest lecturers, visit local government entities, engage in real political interaction, and advocate for relevant, social issues appropriate to the school’s mission. NCAA

5425 U.S. GOVERNMENT WITH SOCIAL JUSTICE
12 YR 1.0 cr
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. This course satisfies the government requirements while introducing students to enduring domestic issues relevant to basic civil rights and liberties. Students use their knowledge of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights to explore ongoing American current events that require ideological examination and demand creative and thoughtful solutions. Topics are fluid and determined by significant contemporary concerns; however, students can expect some issues, which remain constant and germane to the school’s mission to serve as the core curriculum. In the second semester, students can expect to present on current topics, to visit relevant sites and to participate in guest lectures. NCAA

5430 U. S. GOVERNMENT HONORS WITH ADVOCACY AND PUBLIC POLICY
12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in AP U.S. History or U.S. History Honors; or A in U.S. History; and B or higher in current English; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. This course satisfies the government requirements while giving students a deeper knowledge and understanding of effective advocacy and democratic participation. Students explore each level of government while focusing on gaining access to the policy process with the goal of affecting change. Participants gain basic skills in grassroots mobilization, lobbying and negotiation. As an Honors course, students experience an accelerated pace of instruction, extended scope of topic, and an increased depth of learning. This is a student-driven, project-based course in which members hear from expert guest lecturers, visit local government entities, engage in real political interaction, and advocate for relevant, social issues appropriate to the school’s mission. NCAA

5440 U.S. GOVERNMENT HONORS WITH FOREIGN AFFAIRS
12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B- or higher in AP U.S. History or U.S. History Honors; or A in U.S. History; and B or higher in current English; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. This course satisfies the government requirements while giving students a deeper knowledge and understanding of the United States role in global affairs. Students use their knowledge of the executive branch and the U.S. State Department to explore current events, focusing on global crises and the American social, political and military response. Topics include current events, recent conflicts, domestic perspectives, and diplomatic relations. The second semester includes guest speakers, field trips, and lively discussion-based seminars. As an Honors course, students experience an accelerated pace of instruction, extended scope of topic, and an increased depth of learning. Students can expect to engage in both ongoing relevant issues as well as those from the recent past. NCAA

5465 AP U.S. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in AP U.S. History; or A- in U.S. History Honors; and B+ or higher in current English; or department approval. A writing sample may be required.
This course examines the function of government and the political, social and economic aspects of federal, state and local government in the United States. As an AP course, special attention will be paid to college-level concepts and writing. Course readings— text, original documents, government reports, and court cases—are at the college freshman level, and students can expect the material to be challenging. As this course follows the AP curriculum, it will be a year-long study, but contain individual break-out units on current political events, relevant foreign relations concerns, and advocacy. Students are required to take the AP U.S. Government Exam administered by College Board at the end of the school year. The completion of a summer project is required by the beginning of school. NCAA

Technology and Business

BUSINESS COURSES

7250 ACCOUNTING 1 HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Algebra2/Trig.
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic accounting systems in a sole proprietorship and a partnership. It explores the financial records of a service business and a merchandising business. The course introduces terminology that enables students to have a better understanding of the economic and financial activities of the business world for both employment and personal use. It also provides a practical background for future study in accounting and business management. Students are afforded a real-life business situation through an assignment of an accounting practice set for a merchandising business. This is an excellent course for students who are planning to pursue a business major in college.

7310 ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
This elective is a multi-faceted economics and financial management course with emphasis on real-world applications. Students will explore exciting and interesting areas that will help them to gain the necessary skills to ensure their future financial security. Students are instructed in the basic tenets of the American free enterprise system and basic economic theory. Using knowledge learned about economics, students will discover how to make informed financial decisions. Work on computer simulations that relate to both micro and macroeconomics, participating in a virtual stock market game, and preparing a personal budget are integral parts of the course work. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7320 PERSONAL MONEY MANAGEMENT AND YOUR FUTURE
11-12 SEM .5 cr
There are many skills students will need to succeed after graduation that deal with how to handle their personal finances. In this course, students will learn how to navigate the financial decisions they will face and how to make informed decisions related to careers, budgeting, banking, credit, insurance, spending, taxes, saving, investing, living independently, and inheritance. Students will explore topics of high interest that can help them gain the skills needed to ensure future security. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

5515 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
11-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in World History or World History Honors.
In society today, decisions in one part of the world affect others thousands of miles away. This course introduces students to the interrelationships between the business and economic practices of countries. Topics include globalization, ethics, investment, marketing, and trade issues. Students will consider the decisions made by companies when expanding their operations globally and how they must adapt to local business customs and practices. This course serves as a social studies elective and fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7370 SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING
11-12 SEM .5 cr
This class is designed to introduce students to various aspects of sports and entertainment marketing. Each marketing function is incorporated throughout the course. Students explore the history of the sports and entertainment industries; similarities and differences between the two; product, promotion, pricing, branding, imaging, and licensing within these industries; and identifying career opportunities. This course is only offered in the first semester.

5510 AP ECONOMICS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in current Social Studies class; B or higher in current Mathematics and English.
This is a full-year college first-year level course concentrating on an analytical rather than a descriptive approach to the principles of economics. The major aspects of macroeconomics are: economic models, inflation, unemployment, GDP accounting, aggregate demand/supply analysis, the banking system, monetary and fiscal policy and competing theories of income stabilization. The study of microeconomics includes: demand and supply, markets, price theory, elasticity, costs of the business firm, models of pure competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly, international trade and selected topics as time allows. Students are required to take the AP Economics exams in May. This course serves as a social studies elective. NCAA

5965 FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMICS
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This multi-faceted economics course emphasizes real-world applications. Lessons are designed and developed for the purpose of giving students an opportunity to examine principles of economics and business. Students are instructed in the basic tenets of the American free enterprise system and explore its place in the larger global market. Work on computer simulations relating to both micro and macroeconomics is an integral part of the course work. This course serves as a social studies elective. NCAA

COMPUTER COURSES

7530 DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY: GATEWAY TO TOMORROW
9-12 SEM .5 cr
In this hands-on course, students learn to integrate computing concepts that are now essential skills for whatever career path is chosen. Students will apply logic procedures and implement programming procedures, designing and developing programs and Apps, and learning about the latest technology developments. Some topics that will be explored include digital safety and security, Internet of Things, 3D printing, and office productivity. Various software will be used including Scratch, HTML5, AppInventor, and JavaScript. This course is an excellent introductory course for students considering studying computer science, engineering, or business. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7110 PERSONAL BRANDING AND DIGITAL COMMUNICATION
9-11 SEM .5 cr
Drawing from the school’s strong emphasis on Catholic identity, students are lead to recognize ethical and moral situations involved with the use of digital communication platforms, enabling them to express a digital footprint with the proper use of social media and develop a positive and professional personal identity or “brand.” This project-based course provides students with opportunities to create and utilize a digital portfolio, to develop a skill set essential for success in both college and work environments, and to appropriately communicate using digital tools. Additionally, this course serves as a vehicle for students to present themselves to real world audiences, such as in application for special programs or scholarships, through the ability to present their “brand” effectively. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7640 MULTIMEDIA AND IMAGE MANAGEMENT
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
In this project-based course, students explore the creative end of business technology and prepare for a business world in which they are expected to use business-standard software applications to complete projects and solve problems. In this hands-on course, students learn how digital media is used through video, audio, images, and animation. This course allows students to complete several original pieces of digital media including image manipulations, a self-portrait, and an animation movie clip. Students become proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite. This course fulfills both the computer and fine arts requirements for graduation.

7810 HTML: INTRO TO WEB PAGE/MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course focuses on the techniques needed for planning, designing and developing effective web pages. The course introduces students to HTML, CSS, and JAVA Script to create web pages. Among the topics covered are: organization, style, updating, proofreading, incorporation of graphics, and enhancements to the site or application. Students will also learn about current events and issues in the Tech and Web industries. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7920 CYBERSECURITY 1: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SECURITY
10-12 SEM .5 cr
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of basic computer security issues, from the home-user/student/general public’s point-of-view. Students focus on personal security for computer systems and devices at home, at work, on mobile devices, and especially as they relate to the Internet & World Wide Web. The course capitalizes on the incorporation of additional content from the EC-Council, and in activities that link to the Information Security Community, via organizations such as ACM, IEEE, CSTA, ISSA-NOVA, and the EC-Council, and will ultimately allow students to take the EC-Council’s C|SCU Certification Exam, as a first step toward future cybersecurity credential’s achievements. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7930 CYBERSECURITY 2: INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SECURITY
10-12 SEM .5 cr
Prerequisite: Cybersecurity 1
In this course, students are introduced to the fundamentals of network security, including compliance and operational security; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data, and host security; access control and identity management; and cryptography. The course covers emerging topics in network security, including psychological approaches to combating social engineering attacks, Web application attacks, penetration testing, data loss prevention, cloud computing security, and application programming development security. Students also engage in activities that link to organizations such as ACM, IEEE, CSTA, ISSA-NOVA, Cyber Patriots, Cyber Aces, and CompTIA. This course also presents an opportunity for students who choose to pursue further studies and/or training toward additional certifications, such as the CompTIA Security+ SY0-301 Certification Exam. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7775 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Algebra 2/Trig; or department approval.
AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to exploring the underlying principles of computation. Using the Python programming language as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course introduces students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Students are required to complete the AP Computer Science Principles through-course assessment and end of course exam administered by College Board in May. This course is a Project Lead the Way (PLTW) engineering offering and fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

7790 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Successful completion of AP Computer Science Principles (7775) or equivalent; or department approval.
Utilizing the Java Programming language, students advance their study of computer science with an emphasis on developing computer programs or parts of programs to solve problems. Topics include the development and analysis of algorithms, the development and use of fundamental data structures, the design issues that make programs understandable and adaptable, and social and ethical issues in computer science. Students must have access to a network-enabled computer to complete assignments at home, and are required to take the AP Computer Science A exam in May. This course fulfills the computer requirement for graduation.

World Languages

GERMAN

2010 GERMAN 1
9-11 YR 1.0 cr
This course aims to develop the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of dialogues and structural patterns develop skill in pronunciation and listening comprehension. The culture, geography and history of the country are introduced through the use of the text and supplementary materials. NCAA

2020 GERMAN 2
10-11 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: C or higher in German 1.
This course aims to develop further the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of dialogues, narratives and structural patterns and develops skill in pronunciation and listening comprehension. The cultural study of the country continues, augmented with videos and special projects. A German dictionary is required. NCAA

2030 GERMAN 3 HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in German 2 or department approval.
This course continues the development of the four skills of language learning, with an introduction to a more intensive reading program and more complex structures in composition. The study of the culture of the German-speaking countries as well as early history and literature continues. A German dictionary is required. NCAA

2040 GERMAN 4 HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in German 3 Honors or department approval.
Proficiency in composition and oral discussion continues to be developed through oral presentations and supplementary literature. Grammar points are discussed in finer detail and greater complexity. An overview of German history and literature is studied. The cultural concerns of today’s young people in Germany, Austria and Switzerland are explored in conjunction with those activities. A German dictionary is required. NCAA

FRENCH

2100 FRENCH 1
9-11 YR 1.0 cr
This course aims to develop the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of structural patterns, as well as pronunciation and listening comprehension through an oral proficiency approach. The culture, geography and history of the Francophone world are introduced through the use of the text and supplementary materials. NCAA

2200 FRENCH 2
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: C or higher in French 1.
This course aims to develop further the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of narratives and structural patterns, as well as pronunciation and listening comprehension through an oral proficiency approach. The cultural study of the Francophone world continues, augmented with videos and special projects. NCAA

2290 FRENCH 3
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in French 2 or department approval.
This course continues the four skills of language learning, introducing a more intensive study of complex structures. A study of French history and literature is also introduced. CDs, DVDs, and computer technology are used to enhance this course. NCAA

2300 FRENCH 3 HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in French 2 or department approval.
This course includes an intensive study of complex structures with emphasis on translation, writing and oral skills. A survey of French history and literature is conducted. Selected texts, audio and video resources, and other materials enhance this course. Class is conducted primarily in French. NCAA

2420 FRENCH 4
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in French 3; B- or higher in French 3 Honors; or department approval.
This course continues the study of grammatical structures with introduction to the literature and cultural contributions of France and Francophile countries. The goal of this course is to reinforce and refine all four skills of the target language. NCAA

2400 FRENCH 4 HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in French 3 Honors; A or higher in French 3; or department approval.
This course continues the program of study of French, including an in-depth survey of French history, literature, and civilization from the Renaissance to the present. The course also includes an intensive study of grammatical structures, reading comprehension, composition and oral skills. Selected texts, audio, video, DVD’s, and other materials supplement this course. Class is conducted in French. This course is available for dual credit through Marymount University. NCAA

2450 AP FRENCH 5 LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in French 4 Honors or department approval.
This course emphasizes in depth the four basic skills of language learning. The class is conducted entirely in French. Students are required to speak only in the target language. All students are required to take the AP French Exam. One literary text is read, and the course is supplemented with videos, publications, and other resources. NCAA

SPANISH

2500 SPANISH 1
9-11 YR 1.0 cr
This course aims to develop the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of dialogues, narratives and structural patterns and develops skill in pronunciation and listening comprehension. The culture, geography and history of Spain and Latin America are introduced through the use of maps, videos, technology, and other supplementary materials and assignments. NCAA

2600 SPANISH 2
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: C or higher in Spanish 1.
Students attain proficiency in the four skills of language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This approach emphasizes the study of dialogues, narratives and structural patterns and uses CDs and DVD’s to develop skill in pronunciation, critical thinking, and listening comprehension. The cultural study of Spain and Latin America is supplemented with maps, videos and other supplementary material and projects. Technology is integrated into course work to immerse students in authentic language and culture. NCAA

2565 SPANISH SPEAKERS 3 HONORS
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: Placement interview; students are selected based on oral and written skills.
The purpose of the Spanish speakers classes is to refine reading and writing skills of those with native speaking ability. An intensive overview of Spanish grammar, spelling, pronunciation and vocabulary is conducted. The course is enriched with literary and cultural reading selections and projects. Spanish is used exclusively in the classroom. NCAA

2690 SPANISH 3
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Spanish 2 or department approval.
This course further develops the four basic skills of the target language, with an emphasis on improving oral proficiency. Students are expected to have the ability to initiate conversation as well as to understand and respond in Spanish. An intensive study of Spanish culture and geography is supplemented with maps, videos, projects and technology. NCAA

2700 SPANISH 3 HONORS
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B+ or higher in Spanish 2 or department approval.
This advanced course further develops the four basic skills of the target language, with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The curriculum includes literary readings of Spanish and Latin American authors, and introduces more advanced grammatical structures of the language. Classes are conducted primarily in Spanish. NCAA

2820 SPANISH 4
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Spanish 3; B- or higher in Spanish 3 Honors; or department approval.
This course continues the study of grammatical structures with alternate units of introductory literature of Spain and Latin America through short stories. The goal of this course is to reinforce and refine all four skills of the target language. NCAA

2830 SPANISH 4 HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Spanish 3 Honors; A in Spanish 3; or department approval.
This course reviews grammatical structures, and introduces more advanced structures of the language. In addition, it surveys Spanish literature and art. Discussion is in the target language. This course is available for dual credit through Marymount University. NCAA

2890 AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Spanish 4 Honors; A in Spanish 4; and department approval.
The AP Spanish Language and Culture course is a program designed to develop students’ communication skills in Spanish and to prepare students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam. This course emphasizes conversation, composition and advanced grammar. It provides exposure to a variety of materials that expands students’ knowledge of Spanish in both oral and written form. The class is conducted in Spanish. All students are required to take the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam at the conclusion of the course. NCAA

2860 SPANISH 5 HONORS
11-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: B or higher in Spanish 4 Honors; A in Spanish 4; or department approval. Spanish 4 Honors students who qualify for AP Spanish Language and Culture are encouraged to take the AP course rather than Spanish 5 Honors.
Spanish 5 Honors is conducted almost exclusively in the target language, thereby offering the student ample opportunity to practice speaking and listening skills. The student participates in discussions and conversations. The literature, art, history, geography and culture of Spanish-speaking countries are studied alternately during the year. Writing abilities continue to be developed through more advanced student compositions and journal entries. Films and videos are utilized in order to expand the student’s knowledge and understanding of Spanish-speaking people and their cultures. NCAA

2850 AP SPANISH 5 LITERATURE AND CULTURE
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: A in Spanish 4 Honors; or a B or higher in AP Spanish Language and Culture teacher; and department approval.
The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course is the equivalent of a third-year college literature course. It promotes the formal study of a representative body of literature written in Spanish, from Peninsular Spain, Latin America, and the United States. The course offers students ongoing and varied opportunities to develop proficiency in Spanish across a range of skills, with emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing. In addition, the students relate the readings to literary, historical, sociocultural, and geopolitical contexts. All students are required to take the AP Spanish Literature and Culture exam at the conclusion of the course. NCAA

LATIN

2900 LATIN 1
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
In this course the language and culture of the ancient Romans are introduced through a reading based approach. Latin vocabulary and the basic components of grammar are learned. A study of English word formation and vocabulary building from Latin roots is also incorporated into each chapter. NCAA

2950 LATIN 2
9-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: C or higher in Latin 1.
This course continues the study of Latin grammar with an emphasis on more complex grammar. The history and the culture of ancient Rome are also studied. NCAA

2980 LATIN 3 HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: B+ or higher in Latin 2 or department approval.
This course completes the study of Latin grammar. Grammatical principles are reviewed and consolidated as students are introduced to Latin prose and poetry. NCAA

2990 LATIN 4 HONORS
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: B or higher in Latin 3 Honors; B+ or higher in Latin 3; or department approval.
Students continue to develop their skill at translating original Latin texts. In this literature course, students read, in Latin, a variety of prose and poetry authors. In addition to learning the vocabulary and grammar specific to the author, students analyze the work as literature and write short essays in Latin, analyzing and interpreting the literature. NCAA

2995 AP LATIN
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisite: A- in Latin 3 Honors or department approval.
Students read, analyze, and interpret portions of Vergil’s Aeneid and Julius Caesar’s Gallic Wars in Latin. This course follows the syllabus and requirements established by the College Board. Students are required to take the AP Latin Exam in May. NCAA

Peer Mentoring - Expanded Services

1010 EXPANDED SERVICES PEER MENTORING
10-12 YR 1.0 cr
Prerequisites: Counselor recommendation and interview with director of Expanded Services.
In this course, students are matched 1:1 with an Expanded Services student for the purpose of mentoring during one of the mentee’s class periods. Some mentors accompany students to general education classes such as history or physical education; others serve as mentors in classes provided in a small group setting taught by an Expanded Services teacher. Responsibilities of a Peer Mentor include: attending a training session prior to the start of the semester, attending class daily with the assigned mentee, supporting the mentee in the given class, collaborating with the related teachers as needed, and completing weekly online assignments designed to provide broader understanding and context to the student’s role as a mentor. This course option is available for GPA or non-GPA credit or can be used for Christian serviced as a non-credit course.

Unique Academic Programs

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Dual Credit and Dual Enrollment Programs
STEM Program
Global Studies Program